September/October 2022

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*All articles with orange titles are open to the public to read.*

Features in this Issue

Perennials with Fabulous Fall Foliage by Nancy J. Ondra

Many herbaceous perennials and grasses give deciduous trees a run for their money when it comes to colorful fall foliage.

A Fresh Look at Mulch by Charlie Nardozzi

Of all types of material available for mulch, new research suggests that wood offers the most benefits, but it’s important to choose the right kind and apply it correctly.

North American Annuals by Rand B. Lee

If you’re tired of the same old annuals, it’s time to try some of these intriguing native species.

Outwitting Weed Laws by Nancy Lawson

Creators of wildlife-friendly gardens often face challenges from HOA restrictions or weed ordinances. But some gardeners are successfully opposing these restrictions.

In Defense of Patience by Marianne Willburn

While instant gratification is intoxicating, it’s even more gratifying to stop and smell the roses when you’ve watched them root from precious cuttings.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Here’s the latest on AHS programs, events, and other announcements.

AHS News Special

Highlights from the 30th National Children & Youth Garden Symposium this summer in Richmond, Virginia.

RAP Gardens in Focus

A look at gardens that participate in the AHS Reciprocal Admissions Program.
In one of the toughest growing environments in the Lower 48, Cheyenne Botanic Gardens blooms with color and inspiration.

Insect Insights

The spotted lanternfly is on the move in North America, posing a threat to many horticultural industries.

 

 

 

July/August 2022

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*All articles with orange titles are open to the public to read.*

Features in this Issue

Oaks for Everyone by Tim Boland and Matt Lobdell

Oak trees are ecological workhorses, so consider boosting your garden’s wildlife diversity with some of these regional choices.

Sound in the Garden by Karen Bussolini

Welcoming and becoming attuned to sound in a garden adds another dimension of enjoyment.

Superstar Shrubs by Patricia A. Taylor

In smaller gardens, where space is at a premium, these compact evergreen shrubs with vibrant flowers and foliage add four-season interest.

Elements of Flower Garden Design by Jenny Rose Carey

Whether you want to add drama to an existing garden or create one for a specific purpose, knowing how to combine shape, texture, and color can help you achieve beautiful results.

In Defense of Gardening Books by Marianne Willburn

Information is now widely and easily available online, but most it can’t replace what can be found in good books.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

The AHS celebrates its centennial with the Fifty State Flower Project, the AHS Environmental Award is presented at the Philadelphia Flower Show, the AHS Travel Study Program resumes with trips to France and Italy, save the date for the AHS’s gala in September, AHS Partner America in Bloom to hold its annual symposium and awards ceremony this fall in Missouri.

RAP Gardens in Focus

A look at gardens that participate in the AHS Reciprocal Admissions Program.
Once a lavish family summer home, Blithewold Mansion, Gardens and Arboretum in Bristol, Rhode Island, now welcomes visitors to enjoy its beautiful landscape and view of Narragansett Bay.

Insect Insights

Flies are usually viewed as pests, but they serve an important role in the ecosystem.

 

 

 

May/June 2022

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Features in this Issue

Colorful Creeping Phlox by Jim Locklear

Moss phlox and other low-growing native phlox create a carpet of color from late spring into early summer.

Garden Jargon 101 by Scott Aker

A veteran garden communicator recounts some of the most commonly misused or misunderstood gardening terms he has encountered during his long career.

Raising Your Standards by Rita Pelczar

This distinctive form of topiary is easy to achieve and adds a classic element to the landscape.

Unusual Edible Vines by Charlie Nardozzi

Reinvigorate your edible garden this year with one of these unusual climbing vegetables.

In Defense of Revitalizing Our Garden Clubs by Marianne Willburn

With a renewed interest in gardening sweeping the country, traditional garden clubs must reassess their models to meet the needs of younger generations in order to steer themselves towards a sustainable future.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Suzanne Laporte is the AHS’s new president and CEO, the AHS sponsors NDAL’s summer education series, the AHS participates in Seed Your Future, the AHS’s President’s Council tours gardens in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, save the date for the AHS’s gala in September.

AHS News Special: National Children & Youth Garden Symposium

Here’s a preview of the AHS’s 30th National Children & Youth Garden Symposium taking place this July in Richmond, Virginia.

RAP Gardens in Focus

A look at gardens that participate in the AHS Reciprocal Admissions Program.
The Dawes Arboretum in Newark, Ohio, is a great place to experience the many ecosystems and natural beauty of the Midwest.

Insect Insights

Learn about some of the native bees that you might encounter in your backyard or neighborhood landscape.

 

 

 

March/April 2022

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Features in this Issue

Exciting Wild Indigos by Richard Hawke

If you’re seaching for tough, dependable native perennials with beautiful flowers that attract pollinators, look no further than wild indigos (Baptisia spp.).

Elvin McDonald: Communicator Extraordinaire by Kelly D. Norris

Plants, gardens, and the people who tend them are still the inspiration for this legendary garden communicator who got his start in horticulture as a toddler in the Oklahoma panhandle.

Breeding Better Herbs by Peggy Riccio

Developing improved selections of culinary herbs for consumers and gardeners is an ongoing, worldwide endeavor involving science, marketing trends, and a whole lot of patience.

Flowers for Life by Teresa J. Speight

California flower grower Natasha Graham discovered first hand the healing power of flowers and now uses them to also transform the lives of others.

In Defense of Maintenance by Marianne Willburn

Is garden maintenance something we should necessarily seek to escape? Perhaps the better approach is to view mundane tasks as steward rather than servant and value this true connection.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

The AHS’s River Farm headquarters is on the Historic Virginia Garden Week tour in April, the Centennial edition of the AHS Encyclopedia of Gardening Techniques will soon be available, and more.

Great American Gardeners Awards

Meet the recipients of the AHS’s 2022 national awards.

RAP Gardens in Focus

A look at gardens that participate in the AHS Reciprocal Admissions Program.
Find out why rhododendrons are so special at the Rhododendron Species Botanical Garden in Federal Way, Washington.

Regional Happenings

Here’s a look at garden-related events and educational opportunities happening around the country. Many of the venues participate in the AHS Reciprocal Admissions Program and offer free or discounted admission!

 

 

 

January/February 2022

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Features in this Issue

The AHS at 100 by David J. Ellis

Happy 100th Birthday to the AHS! We take a look back at our first century of inspiring and educating gardeners.

New Plants for 2022 by Rita Pelczar

Here’s a preview of some of the new plants that are being introduced in the new year.

A Passion for Pelargoniums by Marty Wingate

San Francisco Bay-area plantswoman Robin Parer has been extolling the virtues of geranium family members for nearly four decades.

Zestful Zinnias by Rand B. Lee

New and improved selections of these beloved annuals make colorful additions to the summer border.

In Defense of Global Garden Inspiration by Marianne Willburn

The benefits gardeners accrue from traveling to visit other gardens are countless.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

The AHS is offering a wealth of learning opportunities in a series of cosponsored webinars and symposia, and several new leaders join the AHS Board of Directors.

RAP Gardens in Focus

A look at gardens that participate in the AHS Reciprocal Admissions Program.
Explore Longue Vue House and Gardens, a New Orleans estate designed by pioneering landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman that is now a cultural landmark.

Insect Insights

A series about the world of insects in our gardens.
Conservationist Danae Wolfe discusses where insects go in winter.

 

 

 

November/December 2021

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Features in this Issue

Gardening for Birds by Jo Ann Abell

Gardens designed to attract birds are not only more interesting, they are more ecologically sound.

A Taste of the Tropics

Add exotic flair to your kitchen and garden with these delicious and attractive tropical herbs.

Outstanding Conifers by Rita Pelczar

This group of trees and shrubs is beautiful year round, but shines brightest in winter.

Divide to Multiply by Denny Schrock

Add to the beauty of your landscape by dividing your own plants to create an impact with masses of identical offspring.

In Defense of the Freedom to Garden by Marianne Willburn

In many residential areas governed by community associations, cookie-cutter landscapes are the norm, which limits the role of gardening’s role as a source of individual and cultural expression.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Keith P. Tomlinson is the new director of the AHS, the AHS to partner with New Directions in the American Landscape in webinar series, how you can help the AHS while shopping online this holiday season, and more.

Insect Insights

A new series about the world of insects in our gardens.
Conservationist Danae Wolfe discusses the importance of  moths in the ecosystem.

Gifts for Gardeners

Nifty ideas for what to give the gardeners on your holiday list.

 

 

September/October 2021

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*All articles with orange titles are open to the public to read.*

Features in this Issue

Bulb Buddies by Nancy J. Ondra

Planting spring bulbs with the right companions makes for doubly pleasing displays.

A Plant Breeder’s Garden by Nina A. Koziol

In his Michigan garden, Hans Hansen shows that plant breeding and garden design skills are not mutually exclusive.

Creating a Moving Experience by Karen Bussolini

Use creative design and plant selection to infuse a garden with a sense of movement and vitality.

Native Viburnums by Jessie Keith

Many native viburnums have ornamental fall fruit and foliage, but these versatile plants shine in the garden year round.

In Defense of Quieter, Healthier Neighborhoods by Marianne Willburn

When gardeners switch from gas-powered tools to electric ones to handle landscaping tasks, everyone benefits.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Debut of Conversations with Great American Gardeners speaker series, seeking feedback on member survey, Inside–Outside House & Garden is new partner, and more.

RAP Gardens in Focus

Lessons on how to conserve water while maintaining a beautiful landscape abound at Red Butte Garden in Salt Lake City.

Insect Insights

A new series about the world of insects in our gardens.
Conservationist Danae Wolfe discusses favorite predator insects.

 

 

July/August 2021

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Features in this Issue

Lighting Up with Foliage by Heather Prince

Variegated and silver foliage can be the foundation for a garden that shines all season long.

The Beauty of Beardtongues by Larry Deaven

Meet the diverse and lovely flowers in the genus Penstemon.

Rancho Arroyo by Jennifer Jewell

Many gardens of the American West draw on the natural beauty of the physical places in which they exist and also serve as oases for wild plants and animals. Find out how one gardener in Arizona created her desert paradise.

Spicing Up the Herb Garden by Jim Long

Ready to move beyond basil, parsley, and thyme? Here are a few worthy culinary plants to add new flavors to your garden and your kitchen.

In Defense of Boundaries by Marianne Willburn

As smaller lot sizes become more conventional in a crowded world, a simple fence has never been a more beneficial structure for gardeners to create a sense of sanctuary and respite.

Highlights from our Departments

RAP Gardens in Focus

A haven for tree lovers, Polly Hill Arboretum on Martha’s Vineyard is the legacy of one gardener’s great horticultural curiosity.

Insect Insights

A new series about the world of insects in our gardens.
Conservationist Danae Wolfe discusses why wasps deserve appreciation.

Gardener’s Notebook

Read about the latest developments in plant research, horticultural industry trends, and more.

 

May/June 2021

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*All articles with orange titles are open to the public to read.*

Features in this Issue

The Bulbs of Summer by David J. Ellis

Add an exotic touch to your garden with an alphabet’s worth of summer-blooming bulbous plants.

Naturalistic Design by Kelly D. Norris

Think layering when you’re planning a beautiful, ecologically complex garden.

Container Compositions by Heather Prince

Instead of placing a single pot on the deck or lining several in a row, consider thoughtfully combining and arranging your containers to create pleasing focal points in your garden.

English Border, Texas Style by Mary and Gary Irish

Natives from the Texas–Mexico region star in this English-style border near San Antonio.

In Defense of Plants without Press by Marianne Willburn

One gardener looks at why an act of goodwill between gardeners—sharing treasured regional plants with friends—may actually be an act of resistance against the plant choices being dictated by marketing teams.

Highlights from our Departments

RAP Gardens in Focus

Sustainability is part of the culture at Green Bay Botanical Garden, which hosts the popular exhibit “Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea” this summer.

Insect Insights

A new series about the world of insects in our gardens.
Conservationist Danae Wolfe discusses ways to help save fireflies.

Gardener’s Notebook

Read about the latest developments in plant research, horticultural industry trends, and more.

 

March/April 2021

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Features in this Issue

Convallaria and Their Kin by C. Colston Burrell

If you like lily of the valley, it’s worth exploring other members of this genus of shade-loving plants.

Gardening Successfully in Summer-Dry Climates by Nora Harlow and Saxon Holt

Climate-driven plant choices are key to successful gardening in North America’s ecologically diverse summer-dry West Coast. But first, you have to understand the nuances of what summer-dry means.

The World of Plant Patenting by Patricia A. Taylor

Have you ever wondered about  how—or why—people patent plants? Here are some real-world examples that show how the process works.

Discovering Hardy Begonias by John Boggan

Begonia grandis is a jumping-off point for exploring a surprising number of other attractive hardy begonia species and cultivars.

In Defense of Inclusive Biodiversity by Marianne Willburn

One gardener argues that when promoting biodiversity in cultivated landscapes, native plants are only part of the solution—and ponders the effects of human efforts in garden evolution.

Highlights from our Departments

Great American Gardener Awards and Book Awards

Meet the recipients of the 2021 AHS Great American Gardener awards and find out which titles received the 2021 Book Awards.

RAP Gardens in Focus

Explore the oldest public Japanese-style garden in the United States—the San Francisco Japanese Tea Garden in Golden Gate Park.

Insect Insights

A new series about the world of insects in our gardens.
Conservationist Danae Wolfe introduces us to the basics of insect taxonomy.

Gardener’s Notebook

Read about the latest developments in plant research, horticultural industry trends, and more.