March/April 2024

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Features in this Issue

Native Ephemerals for Spring Color by C. Colston Burrell

A wide range of native bulbous plants offer color and life in the spring and early-summer garden, no matter where you live.

Planting into the Future by Mary-Kate Mackey

By sorting plants into two categories, you improve your chances of selecting ones that will truly grow into your landscape and provide enduring value.

For One and All by Leslie Bennett and Julie Chai

How one family’s garden became a wonderland for social gatherings, a deeper connection to cultural identity, and a place of beauty and calm.

Supporting Vines by Rita Pelczar

When selecting vines for your garden, be sure to match the plant to the support structure that best enhances it.

A Lemony Twist on Herbs by Jim Long

These easy-to-grow herbs will delight your senses in the garden and infuse a wide range of foods with the scent and flavor of citrus.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

The AHS launches its first online course, new Lifelong Learning programs for spring/summer 2024, youth garden symposium registration now open, five new gardens join the AHS Reciprocal Garden Network, River Farm to participate in Virginia’s Historic Garden Week, AHS’s Spring Garden Market in April.

AHS News Special: 2024 “Great American Gardeners” Awards and Book Awards

Meet the recipients of this year’s AHS awards.

Garden Destinations

Gardens and other attractions in and around Birmingham, Alabama.

Gardening for Wildlife

How to create a wildlife-safe zone in your garden.

 

 

January/February 2024

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Features in this Issue

New Plants for 2024 by Claire Splan

They’re bright and bold, exciting and different. And they’re coming soon to a nursery near you.

Dealing with Drought by Nan Sterman

Drought is a growing issue for gardeners across North America. Here are some ideas to help make your garden more drought resilient in the face of climate change.

The Rise of Plantfluencers by Georgia Silvera Seamans

Creative online influencers are helping a diverse new generation of gardeners begin a love affair with plants.

Looking Beyond Peat by Gail Hudson

Peat moss is widely used in the horticultural world, but a growing number of gardeners are seeking alternatives to this endangered resource.

Camellias: Proven Performers by Bradford King

Camellias are prized for their evergreen foliage and beautiful, roselike flowers that bloom sometime between fall and spring.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

The AHS introduces new vision and branding in 2024, Reciprocal Admissions Program is renamed as AHS Reciprocal Garden Network, two new gardens join the network, Marketplace Events home and garden shows discounted for AHS members, KidsGardening is media sponsor of the AHS’s 2024 National Children & Youth Garden Symposium, save the date for the AHS’s Spring Garden Market.

AHS News Special: Introducing AHS’s Domestic Travel Program

The inaugural trip in August will include a look at the farm-to-table movement in Portland, Oregon.

Garden Destinations

Gardens and other attractions in and around Seattle, Washington.

Edible Gardening

A new growing season is around the corner. Get a jump on it by starting seeds now.

 

 

November/December 2023

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Features in this Issue

Winter’s Promise by Karen Bussolini

Buds protect new growth and herald the coming spring while contributing a subtle charm to the winter landscape.

Getting Tropical with Palms by Scott Zona

You don’t have to live in the tropics to grow palm trees. These iconic plants come in a wide range of heights and habits, and several species are surprisingly hardy.

California’s Monarch Man by Kathleen Brenzel

A mild-mannered general manager of a California nursery during the week, Ron Vanderhoff transforms into “Monarch Man” on weekends in a quest to save endangered western monarch butterflies and other pollinators.

Checking Out Gardening by Noah Lenstra

Across North America, public libraries are embracing a broader role in promoting gardening, creating green spaces, and serving the changing needs of local communities.

In Defense of Gardening Unplugged by Marianne Willburn

Unplugging, at least temporarily, from social media, may help us focus on pursuing the garden of our dreams.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Highlights from the AHS’s 50th anniversary-at-River Farm gala, four new gardens join the AHS’s Reciprocal Admissions Program, magazine contributor Marianne WIllburn is in the running for Garden Writer of the Year from a UK media guild, and the 2024 National Children & Youth Garden Symposium is set for Chicago’s North Shore next July.

Garden Destinations

Gardens, unique garden centers, and other attractions in and around Tucson, Arizona.

Insect Insights

Learn about ways we can all become community insect conservationists.

Edible Gardening

The growing season may be over, but there are still tasks for getting the garden through winter and into a new year.

 

 

September/October 2023

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Features in this Issue

Wildlife-Friendly Groundcovers by Amy Ellsworth

Creating a living tapestry of low-growing native plants provides a healthy habitat for pollinators and other wildlife.

All the Colors of a Green Space by Florence Nishida

The LA Green Grounds Teaching Garden brings the world together in South Los Angeles.

Captivating Toad Lilies by Bill Johnson

Once you get past the common name, the tiny, jewellike flowers of these shade-loving herbaceous perennials will enchant you.

Beautiful Barriers by Viveka Neveln

Protect the perimeters of your garden with prickly but pretty plants.

In Defense of Independent Plant Trials by Marianne Willburn

By examining data from independent plant trials nationwide, gardeners who do their homework are given a great advantage over those who select plants based solely on the growers’ descriptions.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Highlights from the AHS’s National Children & Youth Garden Symposium, five books receive the 2023 Growing Good Kids Book Awards, three new Board members, 2024 destinations in the AHS’s Travel Study Program, AHS receives grant for new pathway at River Farm headquarters.

AHS News Special: Lifelong Learning Programs

Find out about the AHS’s new national educational offerings.

Garden Destinations

Great gardens and garden centers abound near Burlington, Vermont.

Insect Insights

Learn about the many contributions ants make in the environment.

Edible Gardening

Plenty of crops can be grown for harvesting well into fall.

 

 

July/August 2023

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Features in this Issue

Spectacular Salvias by David J. Ellis

Looking for something to liven up the late summer and fall garden? Add floral fireworks from the genus Salvia.

Firewise Landscaping by Kim Toscano Holmes

With the threat of wildfires on the rise across the country, implementing firewise techniques in our landscapes is more important than ever.

Taming America’s Wild Roses by Julie Bawden-Davis

North America’s native roses are rugged, ravishing, and ready to rock your garden.

Kicking the Plastic Pot Habit by Gail Hudson

With concern about plastic pollution rising, home gardeners and the gardening industry are looking for sustainable solutions.

In Defense of Poisonous Plants by Marianne Willburn

When daffodils and hellebores make popular media lists of poisonous plants that gardeners should probably stop growing, it’s a sign that we’ve grown too disconnected with the natural world and our knowledge of it.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

AHS ‘s Conversations with Great American Gardeners webinar series continues, save the date for the AHS’s gala in September, and nominations are being accepted for the 2024 Great American Gardeners Awards.

One on One With….
Jazmin Albarran of Seed Your Future talks about the importance of helping career seekers enter the field of horticulture.

Garden Destinations

Des Moines, Iowa, offers a host of garden venues for plant lovers.

Insect Insights

Learn about the many contributions beetles make in the environment.

Edible Gardening

If you’re new to edible gardening, try these six easy-to-grow herbs to add flavor to your summer meals.

Books

Looking for garden-related summer reading? Here are some noteworthy new books to consider.

 

 

May/June 2023

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Features in this Issue

Evening Primroses by Jim Locklear

Add drama to the evening garden with evening primroses, a diverse genus of native perennials and subshrubs that cater to intriguing pollinators.

Designing Natural Gardens by Benjamin Vogt

With a little research, anyone can create a natural garden using regionally native plants.

Flavorful Homegrown Grapes by Charlie Nardozzi

Enhanced flavors and improved hardiness give home gardeners more growing options.

Tips for Container Gardening by Mary-Kate Mackey

Beautifully designed containers can thrive in challenging environments if you know these tricks of the trade.

In Defense of The Garden Journal by Marianne Willburn

In a world of cell phones and apps, keeping a record of plants, successes, and failures in an old-fashioned journal may be the best way to make ourselves better gardeners and more in tune with the environment.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

AHS ‘s Conversations with Great American Gardeners webinar series returns, Mercedes Bryant is new director of Travel Studies, two new gardens join the AHS’s Reciprocal Admissions Program, and more.

AHS News Special

See what’s in store for the AHS’s National Children & Youth Garden Symposium in Knoxville this July.

Insect Insights

Learn the basics of Integrated Pest Management.

 

 

 

March/April 2023

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Features in this Issue

Indulge in Native Irises by C. Colston Burrell

Native to a wide variety of natural habitats, North American irises can be found for almost any garden setting.

Dry Climate Garden Design: Plant Placement by Noelle Johnson

While many landscape design elements apply to all types of gardens, those who live in dry cllmates need to incorporate some unique regional features to create a lovely and functional space.

Wildlife-Friendly Native Dogwoods by Alan J. Branhagen

If you’re looking for shrubs to encourage wildlife, there are several native dogwoods worth consideration in the garden.

Gardening for Native Bees by Jessie Keith

North America’s native bees are under threat from habitat loss, pesticides, and climate change. Here’s what gardeners can do to help.

In Defense of The Courageous Gardener by Marianne Willburn

Instead of continuing down the same gardening path this year, we need to open our minds and play like children in the natural classroom—cultivating a joyful spirit of curiosity and courage, right along with the carrots.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

AHS co-sponsors webinars from New Directions in the American Landscapes,  three new staff members join the AHS’s leadership team, the AHS’s annual Spring Garden Market to take place at River Farm in April, River Farm is part of tours during Historic Garden Week in Virginia, invasive weed removal underway at River Farm, and more.

AHS News Special

Meet the recipients of the 2023 Great American Gardeners Awards and Book Awards.

One on One With…

A Q&A with former AHS executive director Keister Evans, who oversaw the AHS’s move to River Farm in 1973.

Insect Insights

Learn about the quirky behaviors of treehoppers, leafhoppers, and planthoppers.

 

 

 

January/February 2023

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Features in this Issue

New Plants for 2023 by Claire Splan

Update your garden with some of these new plants available this year.

Horticultural Power Couple by Pam Beck

Horticulture is all in the family for Adrienne and Jon Roethlig, who each directs public gardens 14 miles apart in North Carolina.

Gardening on a Slope by Karen Bussolini

Three experienced gardeners offer suggestions for addressing the challenges of a steep landscape.

Bay Area Garden Revolution by Paul Lee Cannon

Find out how digging up a lawn set an example for waterwise gardening—and cultivated community in a Northern California neighborhood.

In Defense of Dumb Questions. And Smart Answers by Marianne Willburn

How do we inspire people to become more knowledgeable gardeners? By offering them smart, detailed information that challenges them.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

AHS co-sponsors webinars from New Directions in the American Landscape and Perennially Yours, five new gardens join the AHS’s Reciprocal Admissions Program, and save the date for the annual National Children & Youth Garden Symposium on Knoxville this summer.

AHS News Special

An interview with new AHS Board Chair Scott Plein, who shares his vision for the future of the AHS and its headquarters at River Farm.

Global Garden Inspiration

An occasional look at recent destinations in the AHS’s Travel Study Program. In this issue: Skrudur Botanical Garden in Iceland.

Insect Insights

Learn why we need spiders in our gardens.

 

 

 

November/December 2022

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Features in this Issue

Good Garden Primroses by Dean Wiegert

Every gardener deserves at least one of these splendid, hardy, early-blooming perennials in their landscape.

Maintaining an Edge by Rita Pelczar

Edgings physically separate and define spaces in the landscape. Beyond function, they can contribute significant style to a garden.

Winter-Blooming Shrubs by Andrew Bunting

For gardeners who can’t wait for spring, winter-blooming shrubs offer a beacon of hope.

Propagating with Soft Stem Cuttings by Dee Nash

Want to have more of your favorite plants without breaking your budget? Expand your collection with this easy technique.

In Defense of (Later) Horticultural Careers by Marianne Willburn

In the quest to attract young people to horticulture, let’s not forget a more-seasoned population that may enter the industry from less traditional paths.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Highlights from the American Horticultural Society’s 100th Anniversary Gala in September.

Gifts for Gardeners

Garden-themed ideas for holiday gift-giving.

Insect Insights

Monarch butterflies get all the press when it comes to insect conservation, but we need to look at the big picture.

 

 

 

September/October 2022

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Features in this Issue

Perennials with Fabulous Fall Foliage by Nancy J. Ondra

Many herbaceous perennials and grasses give deciduous trees a run for their money when it comes to colorful fall foliage.

A Fresh Look at Mulch by Charlie Nardozzi

Of all types of material available for mulch, new research suggests that wood offers the most benefits, but it’s important to choose the right kind and apply it correctly.

North American Annuals by Rand B. Lee

If you’re tired of the same old annuals, it’s time to try some of these intriguing native species.

Outwitting Weed Laws by Nancy Lawson

Creators of wildlife-friendly gardens often face challenges from HOA restrictions or weed ordinances. But some gardeners are successfully opposing these restrictions.

In Defense of Patience by Marianne Willburn

While instant gratification is intoxicating, it’s even more gratifying to stop and smell the roses when you’ve watched them root from precious cuttings.

Highlights from our Departments

News from the AHS

Here’s the latest on AHS programs, events, and other announcements.

AHS News Special

Highlights from the 30th National Children & Youth Garden Symposium this summer in Richmond, Virginia.

RAP Gardens in Focus

A look at gardens that participate in the AHS Reciprocal Admissions Program.
In one of the toughest growing environments in the Lower 48, Cheyenne Botanic Gardens blooms with color and inspiration.

Insect Insights

The spotted lanternfly is on the move in North America, posing a threat to many horticultural industries.